About us



Management

Director of Polish Medical Air Rescue

 dr n. med. Robert Gałązkowski

Deputy Director of Medical Affairs

 lek. med. Zbigniew Żyła

Deputy Director of Operations and Traning

 pil. mgr inż. Bartłomiej Florczak

Deputy Director of Continuing Airworthiness

 mgr inż. Wojciech Woźniczka

Deputy Director of Finance and Administration

 mgr Paweł Kamiński

Director of Southern Region (Krakow Department Director)

 pil. Marian Kowalczuk

Director of Northern Region (Gdańsk Department Director)

 rat. med. Rafał Szczepański

Director of Eastern Region (Warsaw Department Director)

 pil. Robert Woźniak

Director of Western Region (Szczecin Department Director)

 rat. med. Robert Hełminiak

 

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Executive management

Investments and Real Estate Management Department Manager

 mgr inż. arch. Barbara Próchniewicz-Pudełko

Head Accountant

 mgr Paweł Kamiński

Statistics and Analysys Department

 mgr Paweł Kamiński

Payroll – Personnel Affairs Department Manager

 mgr Renata Pursa

Administration Manager

 mgr Michał Będziak

Flight Operations Department Manager

 pil. mgr inż. Bartłomiej Florczak

Ground Operations Department Manager

 mgr inż. Michał Jabłonowski

Training Department Manager

 mgr inż. Mirosław Tomaszewski

Technical Logistics Department Manager

 mgr inż. Marcin Nowak

Part 145 Organisation Manager

 mgr inż. Marcin Czarnowski

Technical Service Station Manager - Szczecin

 mgr inż. Przemysław Rutkowski

Technical Service Station Manager - Warsaw

 tech. mech. Łukasz Iwanicki

Warehouse Manager

 inż. Andrzej Kadela

Continuous Airworthness Department  Manager

 mgr Janusz Baranowski

State Dispatch Office Manager

 mgr inż. Ewelina Hać

Quality Manager

 mgr Łukasz Leciak

Medical Rescue Department Manager

 mgr Agata Pawlak

Safety and Transportation Security Department Manager

 dr n. tech. Władysław Wołkowski

Security Management System Manager

 pil. Jan Paluch

Radiocommunication Department Manager

 inż. Władysław Sieradzki

Białystok Branch Manager

 pil. Stanisław Iwaszko

Bydgoszcz Branch Manager

 pil. Ryszard Kohls

Gliwice Branch Manager

 rat. med. Grzegorz Stępień

Kielce Branch Manager

 pil. Kazimierz Wójtowicz

Lublin Branch Manager

 pil. Wojciech Misiak

Łódź Branch Manager

 pil. Sławomir Lach

Olsztyn Branch Manager

 pil. Roman Kozłowski

Płock Branch Manager

 rat. med. Mariusz Fabirkiewicz

Poznań Branch Manager

 pil. Stanisław Torzyński

Sanok Branch Manager

 rat. med. Stefan Zubel

Suwałki Branch Manager

 rat. med. Zbigniew Dąbrowski

Wrocław Branch Manager

 rat. med. Grzegorz Frańczak

Zielona Góra Branch Manager

 pil. Paweł Gątkowski

Aeroplane Transportation Team Warsaw-Okecie

 pil. Szymon Krawczyk

 

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Public Relations

 

 

Spokesperson

Ms Justyna Sochacka

(22) 56-81-942

665-012-825

 

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History

 

The first succesful flights to save human life and health were carried out in Poland before the II World War with the use of planes belonging to the military forces and aeroclubs.


After the war, in 1955, civilian medical aviation was set up. Tadeusz Wieckowski, an excellent pilot, member of the Home Army and soldier in the Warsaw Uprising, was given a task to organize it by the minister of health Rajmund Baranski. Soon there were 15 medical aviation teams set up. They were located in such a way that all together they operated on the whole area of Poland. The tasks of the teams were to transport the severely ill to the hospitals, to transport medicines, blood, vaccinations, and medical equipment. Additionally, medical consultants were taken aboard in order to take them to the hospitals in remote parts of Poland to carry out complicated operations.


S-13 biplanes were used in those times. They had relatively small flight speed and were adapted to transport the patient in a recumbent position. These planes were produced in Poland on the basis of CSS-13 planes license. One-engine planes started to be used later on. These were: Jak 12 M, Jak 12 A, PZL 101 Gawron, AN-2. Additionally, multi-engined planes were also introduced, such as Super Aero 45, L-50 Morawa, Turbolet. Some of the teams were equipped in SM-1 and SM-2 helicopters in the mid-sixties. Starting from 1975 in all the bases MI-2 helicopters were introduced.

The basic team consisted of a pilot and nurse (or qualified in medical aid attendant). Doctors from near-by hospitals started to attend patients on board later on.


In 2000 the late minister of health Franciszka Cegielska established a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service. She also set up one organization – The Polish Medical Air Rescue with bases in Poland on 16th of May 2000. Now it is a government financed uniform organization. It employs pilots, paramedics or nurses and doctors in each of the 17 regional HEMS bases. The Polish Medical Air Rescue operates also two medical planes.


The changes resulted in high standards for medical emergency, 4-minutes of operational readiness to an emergency flight including. The number of emergency flights rose dramatically. Nowadays the helicopter teams make more then 5 000 flights a year, out of which 70 per cent are the flights to the casualties of car accidents on site and to other emergencies. The HEMS team is able to begin the treatment and quickly transport the patient to an emergency ward in the nearest hospital within so called “golden hour”.
 

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Fleet

lp.

znaki rejestracyjne

typ/model

1

SP-SXA

Mi-2 PLUS

2

SP-SXB

Mi-2 PLUS

3

SP-SXG

Mi-2 PLUS

4

SP-SXH

Mi-2 PLUS

5

SP-WXG

Mi-2 PLUS

6

SP-WXK

Mi-2 PLUS

7

SP-WXL

Mi-2 PLUS

8

SP-WXM

Mi-2 PLUS

9

SP-WXO

Mi-2 PLUS

10

SP-WXU

Mi-2 PLUS

11

SP-ZXA

Mi-2 PLUS

12

SP-ZXC

Mi-2 PLUS

13

SP-ZXE

Mi-2 PLUS

14

SP-ZXT

Mi-2 PLUS

15

SP-ZXU

Mi-2 PLUS

16

SP-ZXY

Mi-2 PLUS

17

SP-ZXZ

Mi-2 PLUS

18

SP-HXB

EC135

19

SP-HXC

EC135

20

SP-HXD

EC135

21

SP-HXE

EC135

22

SP-HXF

EC135

23

SP-HXG

EC135

24

SP-HXH

EC135

25

SP-HXI

EC135

26

SP-HXK

EC135

27

SP-HXL

EC135

28

SP-HXM

EC135

29

SP-HXN

EC135

30

SP-HXO

EC135

31

SP-HXP

EC135

32

SP-HXR

EC135

33

SP-HXS

EC135

34

SP-HXT

EC135

35

SP-HXU

EC135

36

SP-HXV

EC135

37

SP-HXW

EC135

38

SP-HXX

EC135

39

SP-HXY

EC135

40

SP-HXZ

EC135

41

SP-MXH

Piaggio P.180 Avanti

42

SP-MXI

Piaggio P.180 Avanti II

 

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EC 135

  1. Maximum take-off weight (MTOW): 2910 kg
  2. Take-off power: 2 x 320 kW (2 x 435 KM)
  3. Maximum continuous power: 2x457 kW (2 x 621 KM)
  4. Maximum emergency power (OEI 30”): 526 kW (715 KM)
  5. Intermediate emergency power (OEI 2’): 513 kW (698 KM)
  6. Fuel tank capacity: 710 l
  7. Lenght: 10,21 m
  8. Length (rotor rotating): 12,19 m
  9. Maximum height: 3,62 m
  10. Main rotor diameter: 10,02 m
  11. Tail rotor diameter: 1,0 m
  12. Maximum speed, VNE (MTOW 2910 kg): 259 km/h
  13. Cruise speed (MTOW 2910 kg): 254 km/h
  14. Rate of climb (MTOW 2910 kg): 7,6 m/s
  15. Service ceiling: 13 000 ft
  16. Maximum range (MTOW 2910 kg, without fuel reserve, keeping economic speed and with long – range fuel tank configuration): 835 km
  17. Maximum flight time (parameters same as in point 16): 4,45h
  18. Crew: pilot/2 pilots, rescue worker, doctor, patient.
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Piaggio 180 Avanti

  1. Cruise Speer - 402KTAS(745km/h)
  2. Service ceiling 31,000 ft (9448 m)
  3. Take-off distance (at sea level) - 2850 ft (869 m)
  4. Landing distance (at sea level) - 2860 ft (872 m)
  5. Rate of climb - 2950 ft/min (899m/min)
  6. Service ceiling - 41,000 ft / 12,500 m
  7. Maximum IFR Range (4 passengers on board) - 1,407 NM/2,722 km
  8. Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-66B engines, 1630 HSP each, limited to 850 HSP each
  9. Wing span  - 46.03 ft / 14.03 m
  10. Lenght - 47.28 ft / 14.41 m
  11. Height - 13.06 ft  / 3.98 m
  12. Cabin - height - 5.74 ft / 1.75 m
  13. Cabin - width- 6.07 ft / 1.85 m
  14. Cabin - lenght - 14.93 ft / 4.55 m
  15. Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) - 12,100 lbs/5,489 Kg
  16. Standard Equipped Empty Weight - 7,800 lbs/3,538 Kg
  17. Useful Load (Incl. Crew) - 4,300 lbs/1,950 Kg
  18. Maximum Payload - 2,000 lbs/907 Kg
  19. Maximum amount of seat  - 9 + 2 crew members
  20. Typical seat configuration - 6 + 1 crew member
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Medical equipment

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Requirements for a medical assistant

 

RESCUE WORKER – HEMS CREW MEMBER / NURSE – HEMS CREW MEMBER

  • passing the qualification test;
  • passing the practical test;
  • minimum secondary medical education in rescue or nursing;
  • nurse must fill the proper requirements contained in the polish Act on State Medical Rescue Services;
  • minimum three years of experience in medical profession;
  • fluent knowlege of medical equipment;
  • current hepatitis vaccination;
  • knowledge of MS Office;
  • working in medical team skills;
  • stress resistance;
  • good communication skills;
  • driving licence, B category;
  • knowlege of english language will be additional advantage.
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od 28.02.2011